Opinion: Fix your domain name mental care system to stop the shootings – CNN.com

EDT May 28, 2014 Employees pay higher health care premiums. (Photo: BAY ISMOYO, AFP/Getty Images) 2960 CONNECT 355 TWEET 152 LINKEDIN 251 COMMENTEMAILMORE More employees are getting hit with higher health insurance premiums and co-payments, and many don’t have the money to cover unexpected medical expenses, a new report finds. More than half of companies (56%) increased employees’ share of health care premiums or co-payments for doctors’ visits in 2013, and 59% of employers say they intend to do the same in 2014, according to the annual Aflac WorkForces Report. It’s based on a survey of 1,856 employers and 5,209 employees at small, medium and large-size companies. In 2013, 19% of companies implemented a major medical plan with a high deductible (more than $1,000) and Health Savings Accounts as an alternative to a traditional medical plan, the study finds. Employees are worried about covering their medical costs: 49% have less than $1,000 to pay for unexpected out-of-pocket medical expenses; 53% would borrow from their 401(k)s or credit cards to cover unexpected medical costs; 66% say they wouldn’t be able to adjust to the large financial costs associated with a serious injury or illness. The survey also showed 69% of workers at least somewhat agree that they regularly underestimate the total costs of an injury or illness, including medical, household and out-of-pocket expenses. Many employees are in a “fragile financial situation” and couldn’t afford the out-of-pocket expenses of many medical situations, says Matthew Owenby, vice president of human resources for Aflac, a provider of supplemental insurance, such as accident, cancer, critical illness, dental and vision. Some companies are already offering high-deductible plans and, “I think we’ll see more of this in the future,” he says.
Many employees hit with higher health care premiums

Health care premiums

His parents could call the police when he made threats of violence on YouTube, but unless he was deemed an “immediate threat,” nothing could be done. The police could show up and do a “welfare check,” but they had no legal right to search his apartment and belongings, run a check through the gun registry or take his guns away without a warrant for probable cause. And when Rodger told police it was all one big “misunderstanding,” his explanation determined whether he was going to be committed for treatment — not the words of his parents, his YouTube videos nor the opinions of his mental health professionals. That’s just plain stupid. Opinion: Let teens talk about mental illness We have a system that puts the mentally ill in charge of their mental health decisions. Come again? Under Section 5150 of the California Welfare and Institutions Code, you can only involuntarily commit someone who is an “immediate threat to himself or herself due to mental disorder” or “immediate threat to someone else’s safety” — and that’s only for 72 hours. And once the 72 hour hold is over, if the person is not foaming at the mouth and threatening to harm someone or expressing thoughts of suicide or homicide, he or she is released.
Opinion: Fix mental care system to stop the shootings – CNN.com

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